Monday, November 12, 2012

Some things to watch for

Our household is retired military.
We moved to our house in Kansas for many reasons.
One reason was military retirement health coverage.
When we decided to continue in the military
One consideration was the promise that WE would be
Cared for by the military for life.
When we lived in Flagstaff we saw that system fall apart.
Like the doctors who no longer take Medicare patients,
We kept "being released" from doctor care
Because the military TriCare system did not pay enough
To pay for the current charges of local doctors.
My husband's mantra became
If we want care we need to live close to a military hospital.
When we moved we chose a house 10 miles from a fort's hospital.

This week the military newspaper let it out that
Those who live outside of the 40 mile zone
May no longer use a military hospital.
They will have to use TriCare standard.
TriCare standard pays doctors and hospitals a bit less then Medicare.

We have a large retired military population in a town near us
It is the home of Eisenhower- Abilene Ks. It is 48 miles from the hospital.
Oh we'll,
They get...almost nothing.

Some say that those who retire should have picked up a second career
To get good medical care.
I, in turn, would like them to know
The way that TriCare standard goes-
So goes Medicare.

Good luck!
Stay healthy while the system figures out how to shake off
The baby boomers!

10 comments:

ancient one said...

Girl, we are not military and you are singing my song tonight...We also thought my husbands' employer insurance would be handled for us until the end... Not so.. we have been in the process of trying to decide which insurance to choose to get in before the deadline and of course the premiums are going to be much more than before... Stressful !! Someone asked a former doctor in his 90's the secret to long life. His answer.. "Stay out of the doctor's offices."

Kimberly said...

Glad for you that you are in the 10 mile radius, but that is awful for those in the town. Sounds like you could sell some building land for a song. ;)

rjscorner.net said...

When we finally learn, as much of the rest of the world already knows, that universal healthcare is the only way to control medical costs then these sort of things will not occur.

Before you go off about how our care will degrade notice that we are 37th on the list of the best healthcare systems in the world. Most of them above us are single payer systems.

rjscorner.net said...

When we finally learn, as much of the rest of the world already knows, that universal healthcare is the only way to control medical costs then these sort of things will not occur.

Before you go off about how our care will degrade notice that we are 37th on the list of the best healthcare systems in the world. Most of them above us are single payer systems.

RAnn said...

The big healthcare debate seems to be HOW medical care will be paid for, or perhaps WHO should pay for it (individuals, employers, government and in what proportion) but the question no one seems to want to address is how much should be spent, and how we as a society choose to ration that amount. Yes, rationing is a dirty word but the reality is that everything in life is rationed, in the US generally by cost. How much is a doctor visit worth? Who gets to say? A single-payer system in which everyone has to participate is equal, but I don't think most Americans, especially those who have disposable income, want a government agency telling them they can't buy their way to more care, better care or even more convenient care. Can you blame doctors for not working for $X when they can earn $x+y? How much should be spent to treat expensive illnesses, especially when those expensive treatments only delay the inevitable for a few months? Who gets to say?

Janette said...

RJ
Military medicine IS socialized medicine. I have been under it for 32 years at this point.
Ruth-
you have very good questions. I think they are all difficult to answer. I question more end of life care every day when I see people at the middle of life doing without simply because their family is too middle class to be on Medicaide (or have to wait too long).

Janette said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Janette said...

RJ responded----
Yes, I realize that military healthcare is "socialized" medicine. But the point is as long as there is a much more profitable private healthcare many doctors will opt for the bigger bucks. When we finally get to single-payer then that lure will not be there and everyone will then be on a level playing field. We talked to several people in Canada last year and without exception they were all very satisfied with their healthcare and are shocked to learn how much our system costs to its citizens.

Janette said...

#1 I am FOR universal health care.

There has already begun a second tier of health care in our country. Those who pay a second separate premium for services. They go to private centers for surgery, private places for treatments. That will never be stopped. It is a health care system that you and I will probably never know except through our rich friends and family members. I don't ever see a level playing field.

Maybe that will straighten out after the current group of good doctors die off...in maybe 20- 30 years... I will still be alive when that happens---will you?

BTW- Canada has been straightened out for around 15 years (according to some of my family friends)---it started in 1961! That is way before the average doctor took on $156,000 and eight years extra of their lives to become an MD. +Canada has about 1/2 of our population and no real illegal aliens to worry about.

Still, I know that universal health care CAN work.

RAnn said...

Universal Healthcare can work, but it too has problems. If we don't figure out how to reduce costs then all any healthcare reform will do is shift costs for some. I was at a school board meeting last night and learned that our teacher's healthcare premiums (which the school pays for 100%) are going up about 20% next year; and much of the increase is due to the "Affordable Care Act".

I have read that many of our poor healthcare statistics are due to things outside the control of the healthcare system. In other words, if you eliminate mortality from gunshot wounds and car accidents, our life expectancy is much better than it is with those in the equation. Our survival rates for things like cancer are better than most. We define a 21 week fetus born alive who dies quickly as a live birth and neonatal death; many countries don't, they define it as stillbirth--and we tend to treat premature babies more aggressively with higher survival rates than many.