Monday, June 19, 2017

Can we all get together now?

Long haul.
So far the country has not fallen apart.
We need some changes.
That is what people, in many states, voted for.
Can we PLEASE pass a tax reform law?
And, maybe, attempt to fix the health care system?
Just get it together and get to work!!!!!

Thursday, June 15, 2017

Saturday, June 03, 2017

Ancestry finds

Downtown Abby. I blame that show for my renewed interest in my extended family. What were my ancestors doing at the turn of the 1900's? How did they do during WWI? Spanish Flu?

My great grandparents had three boys in the service during WWI. Grandmother Carrie was a founder of, what is now called, Blue Star Mothers of Baltimore.

My grandmother was the life of the party. Lots of photos of her dressed from full length, serious, with gloves to this one in 1917 near her DC front porch. She worked until she married at 30.












My grandfather was one of her beaus. He joined the war effort and served in France. He kept the letters of introduction his uncles had written if he had been captured or killed.

 My mother's father's parents were in Tennessee, editors of a small, new newspaper.  They succumbed to the flu, leaving my grandfather an orphan. He ended up on a train west--at six.

My son in law's family were homesteaders and physicians in the Oklahoma territory. They worked on the reservations. 
My husband's grandmother was a widow very young, remarried a man with 12 children and lived a tough life in a railway station. This is a more recent photo- but she was born into a "push cart" LDS family and was part of the beginning of Utah.
Last, but not least, is my husband's grandmother. I hope to find her name at Ellis Island. She was 14 when she got on a ship, alone, amazing!

Thursday, June 01, 2017

The White Privilege of "Independent Living"? Stepping into it.

Nursing Care, Home Care, Assisted Living, Independent Living
First, let me say that I am bias.
I do not believe that the elderly should be removed from society in anyway.
It diminishes the input of wisdom that comes with age.
It glorifies only being young, and/or privileged.

Next, let me say, that this is an issue that is something I think about, but have no answers for.

This topic continues to return to me.
Is it possible that Independent and Assisted Living is really just a "White privilege" ?

My mother lives in a beautiful independent living facility.
Really, it is amazing and she is well cared for. For her, it is exactly what she desires and I would never deprive her of her choice.

As I walk with her it comes to my attention that there is only one color in those rooms
White
There is only one status in the building
Middle Upper Class wealth.
Here is an entire group of, mostly professional, people
who worked their way up,
or inherited their way there,
but was that "on the back" of the minorities?

Is this actually the exact same thing we have seen for years with the public school systems.
White sections of a city keeping the minorities in their place by offering them schools, but at a lesser extent.
Separate but equal. Pay more taxes and you get better- but it is still equal. Right?

In old age it is worse. Nursing homes, and what they imply, are quickly being abandoned by the privileged class and being filled by the minority, working class. The middle uppers are moving into the cool Independent Living places. "We"save for it. Buy insurance for it. Deserve it.

An example of the expanding supply of alternatives to nursing homes is the rapid growth of assisted living facilities. However, these facilities cater primarily to relatively well-to-do people with private health insurance, and they tend to be concentrated in areas whose populations have high levels of education, income, and wealth in the form of equity in the value of personally owned housing.8 Such areas are typically suburban and predominantly inhabited by whites.

Growth of Racial and Ethnic Minorities of US Nursing Homes

For, as we see the growth in the predominately white Independent Living centers, we see the equal amount of growth in "Nursing Homes" for minority

I "see" lots of privileged white people who rail against how their minority members are cared for. They are willing to spend more of the working people's money on more education (while moving to lower property tax states or out of the country all together).  They insist on higher pay for all, but rarely shop in the stores or eat in the places that "those" people work in. In fact they are hell bent on keeping "big box" stores out-- especially Walmart---but spend the majority of their money on Amazon while the poor pay extraordinarily high prices at little mom and pop stores in their neighborhoods (instead of foods at those big box stores at a reasonable price). They are upset about illegal immigration, but rarely think about the exploitation of the migrant working --even in their own houses or gardens.  

Something just does not ring true to this plight.  

I do not have an answer, even one. I just am beginning to ask the questions. 
Isn't that where social justice really starts?
My Jesuit upbringing  taught me to think of such things, even when I see that my teachers in those schools retire to beautiful San Francisco hills to be cared for, in the way they are accustom, for the rest of their natural lives. 

The ultimate, do what I say and not what I do?